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A Nice Cup of Inky Tea

☂ Of Malfoys, Mycrofts and Moftiss ☂

48 notes

clarice82:

Mystrade ~ engagement party XDD I guess John took the photo XD~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Manip of this here (x) Art isn’t mine!!! Found it here (x) if you know the artist, plz tell me! <3

clarice82:

Mystrade ~ engagement party XDD I guess John took the photo XD
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Manip of this here (x)
Art isn’t mine!!! Found it here (x) if you know the artist, plz tell me! <3

393,624 notes

zohbugg:

justamerplwithabox:

vivelafat:

prokopetz:

officialdeadparrot:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 
Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.
On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.
The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”
And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:
[stifled giggling]
[reeeeeeally deep breath]
[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]
The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.
In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”
FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 
Everyone else go home

Oh man, so I play trombone, and we got this piece called Florentiner Marsch by Julius Fucik, and we saw this

which is 8 fortes. We were shocked until,

that is 24 fortes who the fuck does that

Who does that?

This guy. Take a good look - that is the moustache of a man with nothing to lose.

Julius IdontgivaFucik

More like Julius Fuckit

this post just kept getting better and better

zohbugg:

justamerplwithabox:

vivelafat:

prokopetz:

officialdeadparrot:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 

Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.

On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.

The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”

And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:

[stifled giggling]

[reeeeeeally deep breath]

[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]

The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.

In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”

FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 

Everyone else go home

Oh man, so I play trombone, and we got this piece called Florentiner Marsch by Julius Fucik, and we saw this

image

which is 8 fortes. We were shocked until,

image

that is 24 fortes who the fuck does that

Who does that?

This guy. Take a good look - that is the moustache of a man with nothing to lose.

Julius IdontgivaFucik

More like Julius Fuckit

this post just kept getting better and better

(Source: housecatincarnate, via wintersoldier-bucky-barnes)

526,512 notes

cornersweetcorner:

shinnomew:

my-littletony:

vixen7:

I’m crying.

ITS BACK

"You’re the worst friend ever" in a monotone voice
I’m very happy

Totally Jean and Eren.

(Source: missinglinc, via wintersoldier-bucky-barnes)

3,885 notes

The violin is a pain in the ass. It makes my heart beat as well, cos you know, everyone who plays the violin, does to the standard I’m supposed to. Sherlock has learnt from the age of four and has bled over that instrument and I faking it, it feels horrible……playing a classical instrument is just such a heinous thing for me, it really really upsets me because the fingering is out, the bow is out, the position is not right, the timing’s not right and that’s what I have to do, I have to just mime it obviously. But there’s also just a bit of sound I make, you can’t hear it but I can hear it and it tortures me. There are those beautiful happy moments where I’m supposed to be serenading my best friend and his wife and it’s like, “Way to ruin that one Ben.” But the music they write for it, is gorgeous and it works and when you get it right, it really works.
Benedict Cumberbatch on playing the violin for Sherlock, Oz Comic Con Experience Panel. (via miss-dramateen)

(via thegameissomething)

137,018 notes

Words to describe someone's voice

adenoidal:
if someone’s voice is adenoidal, some of the sound seems to come through their nose
appealing:
an appealing look, voice etc shows that you want help, approval, or agreement
breathy:
with loud breathing noises
brittle:
if you speak in a brittle voice, you sound as if you are about to cry
croaky:
if someone’s voice sounds croaky, they speak in a low rough voice that sounds as if they have a sore throat
dead:
if someone’s eyes are dead, or if their voice is dead, they feel or show no emotion
disembodied:
a disembodied voice comes from someone who you cannot see
flat:
spoken in a voice that does not go up and down. This word is often used for describing the speech of people from a particular region.
fruity:
a fruity voice or laugh is deep and strong in a pleasant way
grating:
a grating voice, laugh, or sound is unpleasant and annoying
gravelly:
a gravelly voice sounds low and rough
gruff:
a gruff voice has a rough low sound
guttural:
a guttural sound is deep and made at the back of your throat
high-pitched:
a high-pitched voice or sound is very high
hoarse:
someone who is hoarse or has a hoarse voice speaks in a low rough voice, usually because their throat is sore
honeyed:
honeyed words or a honeyed voice sound very nice but you cannot trust the person who is speaking
husky:
a husky voice is deep and sounds hoarse (=as if you have a sore throat), often in an attractive way
low adjective:
a low voice or sound is quiet and difficult to hear
low adverb:
in a deep voice, or with a deep sound
matter-of-fact:
used about someone’s behaviour or voice
modulated:
a modulated voice is controlled and pleasant to listen to
monotonous:
a monotonous sound or voice is boring and unpleasant because it does not change in loudness or become higher or lower
nasal:
someone with a nasal voice sounds as if they are speaking through their nose
orotund:
an orotund voice is loud and clear
penetrating:
a penetrating voice or sound is so high or loud that it makes you slightly uncomfortable
plummy:
a plummy voice or way of speaking is considered to be typical of an English person of a high social class. This word shows that you dislike people who speak like this.
quietly:
in a quiet voice
raucous:
a raucous voice or noise is loud and sounds rough
ringing:
a ringing sound or voice is very loud and clear
rough:
a rough voice is not soft and is unpleasant to listen to
shrill:
a shrill noise or voice is very loud, high, and unpleasant
silvery:
a silvery voice or sound is clear, light, and pleasant
singsong:
if you speak in a singsong voice, your voice rises and falls in a musical way
small:
a small voice or sound is quiet
smoky:
a smoky voice or smoky eyes are sexually attractive in a slightly mysterious way
softly spoken:
someone who is softly spoken has a quiet gentle voice
sotto voce adjective, adverb:
in a very quiet voice
stentorian:
a stentorian voice sounds very loud and severe
strangled:
a strangled sound is one that someone stops before they finish making it
strangulated:
strangled
strident:
a strident voice or sound is loud and unpleasant
taut:
used about something such as a voice or expression that shows someone is nervous or angry
thick:
if your voice is thick with an emotion, it sounds less clear than usual because of the emotion
thickly:
with a low voice that comes mostly from your throat
thin:
a thin voice or sound is high and unpleasant to listen to
throaty:
a throaty sound is low and seems to come from deep in your throat
tight:
a tight voice or expression shows that you are nervous or annoyed
toneless:
a toneless voice does not express any emotion
tremulous:
if something such as your voice or smile is tremulous, it is not steady, for example because you are afraid or excited
wheezy:
a wheezy noise sounds as if it is made by someone who has difficulty breathing
wobbly:
if your voice is wobbly, it goes up and down, usually because you are frightened, not confident, or are going to cry
I always find these useful, just for when you know your writing is bland.